Mighty Final Fight – Review

Side-scrolling beat ‘em ups were huge in arcades in the 80s. However, home consoles of the 80s struggled to replicate the arcade versions, which were far superior. Although the NES and Master System produced some good quality beat ‘em ups, it wouldn’t be until the late 80s that “arcade quality” beat ‘em ups could be found on home consoles like the Sega Mega Drive.

titlescreen (Screenshot taken by the author)

Mighty Final Fight is a side-scrolling beat ‘em up developed and published by Capcom in 1993 for the NES. It is a spin-off of the 1989 arcade classic Final Fight. It was later released on the Game Boy Advance (2006) and Wii Virtual Console (2014). I chose to review the NES version.

The Mad Gear Gang, the most notorious crime gang in Metro City, have kidnapped Jessica, the daughter of Haggar, mayor of the city. Along with Cody, Jessica’s boyfriend, and Cody’s training partner, Guy, they attempt to rescue her from the gang.

Sadly, the game can only be played in single-player mode (Screenshot taken by the author)

You can choose to be either:

Haggar – City Mayor and former professional wrestler

Cody – A street fighter who has developed his own unique fighting style by fusing boxing and karate

Guy – A master of Ninjutsu

Each with their own strengths and fighting styles. As the game progresses, you gain experience points which increase the strength of your character and unlock more fighting moves. Weapons can be found throughout the levels but they are dependant on the character your are playing as (Cody – knife, Guy – shuriken, Haggar – oversized mallet).

The graphics have been adapted in the Chibi art style (Screenshot taken by the author)

The game has been redesigned in the Chibi art style which gives  the characters and overall game a more childlike look. The graphics and backgrounds are a great improvement on previous games such as Double Dragon and Renegade, even if Haggar does look like he has a huge double chin. However, by 1993, the SNES and Mega Drive were already producing far superior titles such as Streets of Rage, Golden Axe and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles IV: Turtles in Time. There is also a limited number of sprites allowed on the screen at any one time, and there is a fair bit of flicker when fighting. This game is clearly pushing the NES to its limits.

The gameplay is pretty good. The controls are responsive, and the hit detection is spot on. The introduction of new moves keeps the fighting interesting too.

What really let’s this game down is that it is a single-player game and there is only one difficulty setting. This is a real shame, as side-scrolling fighters are always better in two-player mode. Without a two-player mode and the chance to increase the game’s difficulty, this game will never become a staple for late night gaming with buddies. However, it is slightly redeemed by having three distinct characters does add to the replay value of the game a little.

Did I complete the game?

Yes, my go to character is Cody. My older brother’s choice was always Guy.

What the critics said:

At present, I have been unable to locate a contemporary review.

My verdict:

“A fun little beat ‘em up which looks great, for a NES game, and plays very well. Good differentiation between the characters but a lack of two-player mode severely limits its replay value.”

Rating:

What are your memories of Mighty Final Fight? I would love to hear your thoughts, and don’t for get to follow and subscribe so that you don’t miss my latest reviews! You can also find me on Instagram: @Nicklovestogame.

Street Fighter 2010: The Final Fight – Review

Sometimes an original game or franchise contains characters or ideas for spin-offs. Some are successful such as Super Mario Kart and Donkey Kong Country…but others are real stinkers. I’ve recently read several articles titled ‘Top Ten Spin-Offs That Sucked’ or titles to that effect. Most of the games cited in those articles I have never played and so cannot comment on them. However, Street Fighter 2010: The Final Fight did…and I’m afraid I have to agree.

Titlescreen (Screenshot taken by the author)

Street Fighter 2010: Final Fight is a side-scrolling platform game developed and published by Capcom and released on the NES in 1990. It was later released on the 3DS Virtual Console in 2014, and Wii U Virtual Console in 2015. I chose to review the NES version.

According to the history of this game, Ken won the original Street Fighter tournament. He later retired and became a scientist (as you do) who developed cyboplasm, a substance that gives superhuman strength to whoever uses it. Naturally, Ken has taken the substance to keep himself in tip-top shape. One day, Ken’s lab partner, Troy, is murdered and the cyboplasm is stolen leading Ken to pursue the murderer to the far reaches of the galaxy. Oh, and the future has interplanetary warp gates to assist travel between planets.

The game looks pretty good. I just couldn’t get on with the gameplay (Screenshot taken by the author)

Firstly, I have to say that I got the feeling that this game was given the Street Fighter title because the creators wanted to cash in on the franchise. It’s such a departure from the original format that I cannot understand how they thought it would tie in in a believable way.

Having said that, the graphics are good! However, the controls are frustrating. the difficulty is too damn hard and it’s not very enjoyable at all. You can jump, climb walls and back flip, you can fire short range projectiles left, right, up, down (when flip-jumping) and diagonally up…but for some reason you can’t crouch or fire diagonally down. This is fine but there are flying machines that seem to attack you from low down and you are unable to defend yourself. Had crouching and firing diagonally down been possible, this game would have been a lot more enjoyable. Alas, it wasn’t possible, and the frustration led to me simply getting annoyed and moving on.

Did I complete the game?

No, I only got to level 2.

What the critics said:

At present, I have been unable to find contemporary reviews.

My verdict:

“An odd spin-off with a totally different format to the original franchise. The controls suck as does the difficulty level.”

Rating:

What are your memories of Street Fighter 2010: The FInal Fight? I would love to hear your thoughts, and don’t for get to follow and subscribe so that you don’t miss my latest reviews! You can also find me on Instagram: @Nicklovestogame.

Chip & Dale Rescue Rangers – Review

“Ch, Ch, Ch, Chip and Dale. Rescue Rangers!!!”

Titlescreen (Screenshot taken by the author)

Chip ‘n’ Dale Rescue Rangers is a platform game developed and published by Capcom and released for the NES in 1990. It would later be released in the 2017 The Disney Compilation Collection for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. I chose to review the NES version.

The evil Fat Cat has stolen Mandy’s kitten. The Rescue Rangers pledge to rescue the kitten. Through streets, over and through buildings, and forests; Chip and Dale must evade foes such as mechanical bulldogs, robotic rats, and gansgter lizard-type things known as warts. You can choose to dodge these dangerous foes or throw various items such as crates and apples at them. After each level, Gadget offers some advice about how to defeat the trickier aspects of the next level.

You can use objects such as crates and apples to throw at your enemies (Screenshot taken by the author)

The game can be played in on or two-player mode. In one-player mode, you can choose to be either Chip or Dale. Each player can only be hit three times before they die.

The levels are brightly coloured, well designed and detailed, and pose a nice challenge for the average gamer. The sprites are well animated and the controls are sharp and responsive. It is easy to distinguish between the two protangonists as Chip wears a hat and a dark jacket.

The game has many trickier parts but it is enjoyable to play. I wasn’t expecting to like this game but I really enjoyed it. Although the game has minimal replay value, it’s a lot of fun and a great game to be played with a younger sibling or child.

Did I complete the game?

Yes

What the critics said:

Electronic Gaming Monthly: “Every part of this game from the graphics, to the sounds to the gameplay are well done indeed. Rescue Rangers only falls flat in terms of challenge and difficulty. Overall 7.75/10.[1]

Nintendo Power: “Overall 4/5.[2]

Mean Machines: “Not groundbreakingly original, but very good nonetheless. Fun to play and long-lasting Overall 88%.”[3]

Total!: “Groovesome, slick and utterly dashing platform game with some ingenious two-player twist and a brain curdling difficulty curve! Overall 81%.[4]

Awards:

Parents’ Choice (1990) – Parents’ Choice Foundation[5]

My Verdict:

“This game looks great…but don’t be fooled by its cutsie look. There are some challenging parts to it, but nothing a seasoned gamer can’t handle. Excellent gameplay too. I enjoyed it more than I thought I would.”

Rating:

What are your memories of Chip & Dale Rescue Rangers? I would love to hear your thoughts, and don’t for get to follow and subscribe so that you don’t miss my latest reviews! You can also find me on Instagram: @Nicklovestogame.


[1] ‘Review – Chip and Dale Rescue Rangers.’ Electronic Gaming Monthly. (July 1990). Issue 12:12. (https://retrocdn.net/images/a/a1/EGM_US_012.pdf Accessed 12th October 2020).

[2] ‘Chip and Dale Rescue Rangers’. Nintendo Power. (July-August 1990). Issue 14:26. (https://archive.org/details/NintendoPower1988-2004/Nintendo%20Power%20Issue%20014%20%28July-August%201990%29/page/n25/mode/2up Accessed 12th October 2020).

[3] ‘Nintendo review – Rescue Rangers’. Mean Machines. (February 1992). Issue 17:52-4.   (https://web.archive.org/web/20190519025012/http://www.meanmachinesmag.co.uk/pdf/rescuerangersnes.pdf Accessed 12th October 2020).

[4] ‘Chip ‘n’ Dale’. Total!. (April 1992). Issue 4:26-7. (https://archive.org/details/Total_Issue_004_1992-04_Future_Publishing_GB/page/n25/mode/2up Accessed 12th October 2020).

[5] ‘Keeping Kids Entertained’. The Seattle Times. (Dec 27, 1990) (https://archive.seattletimes.com/archive/?date=19901227&slug=1111657 Accessed 12th October 2020).

Golden Axe – Review

Video games set in fantasy lands have always been popular. There is something enthralling about controlling musclebound and bronzed barbarians, big-breasted Amazonian women and axe-wielding dwarves who can not only hack their way through masses of monsters but also use incredible magic when the situation warrants it. I mean, who doesn’t want to play a video game like that?

Titlescreen (Screenshot taken by the author)

Golden Axe is a side-scrolling arcade hack ‘n’ slash developed and published by Sega, and released for the arcade in 1989. Over the next few years, it was later ported to the following:

Mega Drive/Genesis

Master System

Sega CD

IBM

PC

Amiga

Atari ST

Amstrad CPC

Commodore 64

Turbo Grafix-16

Wonder Swan

ZX Spectrum

For this review, I replayed the Mega Drive version from 1990.

You can choose to fight as either Ax Battler, Tyrius Flare ot Gilius Thunderhead (Screenshot taken by the author)

Set in a high-fantasy land of Yuria, the evil Death Adder has risen to power. His soldiers are responsible for the massacre of thousands of peaceful villagers. Soon, he kidnaps the King of Yuria and his daughter and steals the Golden Axe. Thankfully, three warriors emerge who are capable of saving the kingdom:

Ax Battler – a mighty barbarian from the far plains. He seeks to avenge the death of his mother. He is brave and strong, and wields volcanic magic.

Tyrius Flare – an Amazonian from deep within the jungles whose mother and father were killed by Death Adder. She has skill with the sword and possesses immense magical power that can rain down fire upon her enemies.

Gilius Thunderhead – a dwarf who wields a mighty axe and uses his speed and cunning to defeat his enemies. He seeks to avenge the death of his brother at the hands of Death Adder. His magic ability sees bolts of lightning strike from the heavens.

Together, they have sworn to purge Yuria of the pestilence that is Death Adder’s army and rescue the king and princess.

My personal favourite is Gilius Thunderhead (Screenshot taken by the author)

To progress through the game, your heroes must battle through hordes of Death Adder’s ugly minions. Along the way, you will come across elves whom you can attack for magic and food. If things become too desperate, all three can use their individual magical powers to destroy their enemies. Galius is limited to three bars, Ax to four bars and Tyrius to six bars. Tyrius magic is the more powerful out of the three.

Some Bizzarians can come in very useful (Screenshot taken by the author)

The controls are slick and responsive, and the hit detection is spot on. The two main tactics you will use is to either hack and slash your way through or charge at your enemies from a distance and either kick, shoulder barge or headbutt them. So, it’s not just a case of button mashing. You need to change your strategy depending on the enemy you’re facing. Occasionally, you may capture a Bizzarian. These weird creatures consist of one weird pink creature with a beak that uses its tail to swipe at your enemies, or dragons who breathe fire (blue = flame, pink = fireball). Interestingly, thetail swiping Bizzarian looks similar to the one’s seen in Altered Beast. Could it be that Golden Axe and Altered Beast are in the same universe?

The graphics look fantastic, expecially the backgrounds which are very detailed. The sprites look great and are animated well. Interestingly, Gilius Thunderhead seems to appear as a shopkeeper in Shining in the Darkness. Even one of his sacks in the store contains a face of one of the elves from Golden Axe. Again, does this mean that Golden Axe, Altered Beast and Shining in the Darkness are all set in the same universe?

Naturally, the game can be played in one- or two-player mode. There are three difficulty settings: Easy, Normal and Hard, and you can adjust the number of life bars you begin from three to five. You also begin with three lives and three continues. Watch out though, in two-player mode as you can damage your co-op buddy.

Arcade mode sees you play through all the stages whereas Beginner mode only takes you to level 3 where you fight Death Adder Jr. Duel mode sees you fight in 12 consecutive battles against increasingly harder opponents.

I have a lot of memories with Golden Axe playing with my siblings. Again, it is a game that has given me many hours of fun, and I have returned to year after year, even though I can easily complete the game. When I play in two player mode, I don’t necessarily think it is about the challenge, but more trying to recapture an adventure with my younger brother.

Did I complete the game?

Yes, I have completed this game many times over the years on easy. Strangely, I don’t think I have ever played this game on the Normal or Hard settings. I must remedy that.

What the critics said:

Electronic Gaming Monthly: “The screen graphics are perfect, with exceptional detail in in both the characters and background. The game is almost exactly like the arcade, with endless fighting filling each round. Axe moves slow, but has all the hack and slash action you could ask for. Overall 29/40”.[1]

Mean Machines: “A flawless conversion that even improves on the arcade game! Superb! Overall 91%”.[2]

Game Machine: “The character sprites are all big and bold, with more than a rainbowful of colours. The pounding soundtrack only adds to the involving and inviting atmosphere of the game. Fast action, superb attention to detail in the fight sequences and some breathtaking magical spells makes Golden Axe a must for all arcade action fans. Overall 92%”.[3]

Zero: “Everything about this game is good; graphics, sound and playability. One-player is brill; two-player is unbeatable. Overall 94%”.[4]

Wizard: “Again, another first generation Sega game. Medieval action game. Overall C”.[5]

Sega Power: “Hack-‘n’-slash with all the frills of the classic coin-op. Two-player mode isn’t as smooth as expected and for one it’s easy to finish. Still, hugely playable and addictive! Overall 4/5”.[6]

My verdict:

“An excellent coin-op conversion. It looks great, plays great and the two-player mode will have you coming back again and again.”

Rating:

What are your memories of Golden Axe? I would love to hear your thoughts, and don’t for get to follow and subscribe so that you don’t miss my latest reviews! You can also find me on Instagram: @Nicklovestogame.


[1] ‘Review: Genesis – Golden Axe’. Electronic Gaming Monthly. (March 1990). Issue 8:22.(https://retrocdn.net/images/6/6e/EGM_US_008.pdf Accessed 23rd September 2020)

[2] ‘Mega Drive Review – Golden Axe’. Mean Machines. (October 1990). Issue 1:42-4. (https://archive.org/details/Mean_Machines_Issue_01_1990-10_EMAP_Images_GB/page/n43/mode/2up Accessed 23rd September 2020).

[3] ‘Review: Mega Drive – Golden Axe’. Game Machine. (March 1990). Issue 28:30-1. (http://amr.abime.net/issue_841_pages Accessed 24th September 2020).

[4] ‘Review: Mega Drive – Golden Axe’. (April 1990) Issue 6:74. (https://archive.org/details/zero-magazine-06/page/n73/mode/2up Accessed 24th September 2020).

[5] ‘Game Reviews – Golden Axe’. Wizard. (January 1993). Issue 17:24. (https://archive.org/details/WizardMagazine017/page/n27/mode/2up Accessed 24th September 2020).

[6] ‘The Hard Line – Golden Axe.’ Sega Power. (October 1991). Issue 23:53. (https://retrocdn.net/images/8/89/SegaPower_UK_23.pdf Accessed 6th October 2020).