Dynamite Headdy – Review

I’m often conflicted when rating video games. I tend to give my personal rating before I read the reviews of contemporary critics so as not to affect my personal rating. For the most part, we are in agreement. However, on occasion, I disagree with reviewers rating a game either higher or lower than expected. Dynamite Headdy is one such game.

Title screen (Screenshot taken by the author)

Dynamite Headdy is a single-player platform game developed by Treasure Co., Ltd and published by Sega. It was released for the Mega Drive in 1994 with an 8-bit version being ported to the Game Gear and Master System soon after. It was later released for the Wii Virtual Console (2007), the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 via Sonic’s Ultimate Gensis Collection, and the Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, Microsift Windows Mac OS X and Linux in 2018. For this review, I played the Mega Drive version.

Life was fun at the Treasure Theatre Show until Dark Demon began converting its inhabitants to evil minions. It’s up to Headdy to pursue Dark Demon and defeat him in order to save his friends.

You play as Headdy, a puppet who has the ability to throw his own head at his enemies or to use it to grab Hangmen (round balls) to help him climb to higher parts of the level. Headdy also has the ability to change his head to other heads that give him special abilities, similar to Kid Chameleon (1992). For the most part, there are up to 14 different heads that can be utilised by Headdy. In some later levels, another three are utilised to help Headdy fly.

At the end of each level, Headdy must face a Keymaster. His friend Beau usually shows up to direct Headdy as to where he must hit the Keymaster to defeat them.  

I owned Dynamite Headdy as a teenager and remember playing it over and over again but never completing it. Having revisited the game, I’m sorry to say that I just didn’t enjoy it at all. I actually found the game annoying and it felt like a half-baked idea to me.

That being said, the controls are tight and the gameplay relatively simple. I like the fact that Headdy can throw his head in all directions and can be utilised as a weapon or as an aid to reach higher platforms.

The graphics are bright and colourful. The sprites look great and there is enough variation to keep the game interesting. The animations are quite cool too, like when Headdy has been idle for a while, he’ll take off his head and bounce it like a basketball. However, the music is down right annoying and I found that soon, I’d turned the volume down.

The numerous heads with their unique abilities make the game play quite fun. Although, I wish there they were more integral to the game. Although there are times when swapping heads is necessary, and allows your to pick your route based on the head you pick, I felt as though the game could be beaten with using minimal head swaps when the game really should be full of areas where you cannot progress without acquiring the correct head.

What spoils the game for me, is that it feels very chaotic and discombobulated. The levels seem quite short and just when you’re getting into it, it ends or changes scene. There are also seems to be endless boss battles and although some are quite quirky and ingenious, they grow tiresome as oppose to simply being a good challenge.

The so called “treasures” are not really worth the effort to get.

The game itself is quite long, but offers little in the way of replay value. I can’t see myself returning to play this again anytime soon.

Did I complete the game?

No, I couldn’t get past level 6-2.

What the critics said:

Electronic Gaming Monthly: “Another unique title from the folks at Treasure (the company that gave us Gunstar Heroes). The main character, Headdy, has several excellent attacks (using different “heads”), and the levels are very colorful, with some knockout visual effects (like the rotating platforms, and the giant blimp dog Boss). This is a top action title for the Genesis. Overall 7.6/10.[1]

Gamesmaster: “Is it going too far to suggest that this is Treasure’s contractual obligation game? Probably. Nevertheless, it doesn’t shine like their previous projects. Let’s hope their next one is more of a return to form. Not a disaster but should have been so much better. Overall 76%. [2]

Mean Machines Sega: “If you have your head firmly screwed on, you’ll get Headdy as soon as it comes out. No ifs, no butts! Overall 93%.[3]

Next Generation: “Unlike most games, no two levels or bosses look alike. Most importantly, Dynamite Headdy is loaded with good old-fashioned fun, and that’s what gaming is all about. Isn’t it? Overall 4/5.[4]

My Verdict: “This game is chaotic, frustrating, and feels you’re just being carried through the game as oppose to navigating it yourself. The levels are very linear and rather small when compared to games like Sonic the Hedgehog 3. It’s a Marmite game. You’ll either love it or you’ll hate it.”

My Rating:

What are your memories of Dynamite Headdy? I would love to hear your thoughts, and don’t for get to follow and subscribe so that you don’t miss my latest reviews! You can also find me on Instagram: @nicklovestogame.


[1] ‘Review Crew – Dynamite Headdy’. Electronic Gaming Monthly. (September 1994). Volume 7, Issue 9:36 (https://archive.org/details/Electronic_Gaming_Monthly_62/page/n37/mode/2up Accessed 9th May 2021).

[2] Tucker, T., ‘Review – Dynamite Headdy’. Gamesmaster. (October 1994). Issue 22:52-3. (https://retrocdn.net/images/f/f9/GamesMaster_UK_022.pdf Accessed 9th May 2021).

[3] ‘Review – Dynamite Headdy.’ Mean Machines Sega. (November 1994). Issue 25:74-7. (https://archive.org/details/mean-machines-sega-magazine-25/page/n75/mode/2up Accessed 9th May 2021).

[4] ‘Rating genesis – Dynamite Headdy’. Next Generation. (January 1995). Issue 1:99-101. (https://archive.org/details/nextgen-issue-001/page/n105/mode/2up Accessed 9th May 2021).

Dr. Robotnik’s Mean Bean Machine – Review

Puzzle games have always been popular. Humans clearly enjoy the mental challenge of solving a puzzle as well as the competitive challenge of solving it faster than a friend or opponent. One would presume that many puzzle games such as Tetris (1984), Columns (1989), Pipe Mania (1989) and Shanghai (1986) were cheap and easy to produce. Their popularity stems from the personal challenge as well as the fact that they are easy to learn but difficult to master. As the complexity of video games increased, how could game creators use the ideas from previous puzzle games and expand them for modern gamers of the 1990s? One answer was Dr. Robotnik’s Mean Bean Machine.

Title screen (Screenshot taken by the author)

Dr. Robotnik’s Mean Bean Machine is a falling block puzzle game and can be played in single or two-player mode. It was developed by Compile Co., Ltd. and published by Sega. It was released on the following platforms:

Mega Drive and Game Gear in 1993

Master System in 1994

Sonic Mega Collection for the GameCube in 2002

Wii Virtual Console in 2006

Sega Mega Collection Plus for the PlayStation 2 and Xbox in 2004

Sonic’s Ultimate Genesis Collection for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 in 2009

Microsoft Windows in 2010

Nintendo 3DS in 2013

For this review, I played the version found on the Sonic’s Ultimate Genesis Collection (2009).

On the planet Mobius, Dr. Robotnik, Sonic the Hedgehog’s arch nemesis, has created a Mean Bean-Steaming Machine in order to turn the peaceful inhabitants of Beanville into evil robots. Once he has his army, he intends to ensure that music and fun disappear from Mobius forever…what a miserable bugger!

The game is similar to Tetris (1984) and Columns (1989), in that blocks, or in this case two coloured beans, fall from the top of the screen. As they slowly descend, you must decide where to place them before they reach the bottom. You can rotate them in order to place them vertically or horizontally, as well as changing which order the coloured beans are placed in.

When beans of the same colour are either on top, below or either side of another bean of the same colour, they form a link. When you link four or more beans together, they will disappear allowing earning you points and allowing beans that were above them to fall directly downward. The more beans you make disappear, the higher your score. The game ends when either you or your opponent’s dungeon is completely filled with beans.

To make this game more challenging, if you make more than one set of coloured beans disappear in a chain reaction, for example, then ‘refugee’ beans appear above your opponent’s screen. They will eventually fall and block your opponent from matching beans together. These ‘refugee’ beans can be made to disappear by matching four or more of that same-coloured beans whilst the ‘refugee’ beans are directly above, below or adjacent to the matching ones.

(Screenshot taken by the author)

The game is very easy to learn, and the controls are simple. A practice mode is available, but you really won’t need to bother with this unless you are a younger or more inexperienced gamer.

The graphics won’t blow you away, but they don’t need to. They are perfect for what this game is. They are bright and colourful, and beans are easily distinguishable.

The in-game music is very good. I particularly like the descending riff. I don’t know whether this riff was intentionally created to accentuate the fact that the beans are falling or whether this is a coincidence. Either way, I liked the music for this game.

Be warned, this game is not walk in the park! It is a tough game, and will take time and a multitude of continues to beat it. Luckily, the creators give you infinite continues and offer a password system so that you don’t need to keep going back to the beginning.

I’m not really a fan of these types of games but the more I played it, the more I enjoyed it. Its fun and really comes into its own in two-player mode.

Did I complete the game?

No, I couldn’t get past the 8th stage.

What the critics Said:

Computer & Video Games: “…is as addictive and frustrating as the game it’s based on, the famous puzzler Tetris. The beans are a lot cuter and colourful than a bunch of bricks, and you also have to compete against the computer, which plays on a screen next to you; this makes the game even more difficult to complete. The graphics are bright and colourful, although not too adventurous, but it’s all good, obsessive fun. Overall 90%.[1]

GamePro: “Despite a lot of similarities to Tetris, Columns, and other classic puzzlers, this game is no has-bean. The offensive strategy makes it especially fun when playing against a friend. Games of this kind seem few and far between for the Genesis, so fans of this genre should find Mean bean Machine a match made in heaven. Overall 4.375/5.[2]

Mega: “Don’t let the seemingly innocuous exterior and simplistic appearance put you off. Mean Bean Machine is a devilishly addictive game which even haters of all stings Sonic-related will love.Overall 90%”.[3]

My Verdict: “Bright, colourful with quirky music, this game is a lot of fun and particularly comes into its own in two-player mode. However, it is just too darn difficult in single player mode for the casual gamer. If you’re a fan of these sorts of puzzle games will love this game. If not, it is still worth a place in your collection.”

Rating:

What are your memories of De-Cap Attack? I would love to hear your thoughts, and don’t for get to follow and subscribe so that you don’t miss my latest reviews! You can also find me on Instagram: @nicklovestogame.


[1] Tipping, A., Computer & Video Games. (January 1994). Issue 146:93. (https://retrocdn.net/images/6/63/CVG_UK_146.pdf Accessed 28th April 2021).

[2] Andromeda, ‘Genesis ProReview – Dr. Robotnik’s Mean Bean Machine’. (January 1994). Volume 6, Number 1:58.  GamePro. https://retrocdn.net/images/e/ec/GamePro_US_054.pdf Accessed 5th May 2021).

[3] Dyer, A., Dr. Robotnik’s Mean Bean Machine. Mega. (January 1994). :48-9. (https://retrocdn.net/images/a/a3/Mega_UK_16.pdf Accessed 5th May 2021).