Dynamite Headdy – Review

I’m often conflicted when rating video games. I tend to give my personal rating before I read the reviews of contemporary critics so as not to affect my personal rating. For the most part, we are in agreement. However, on occasion, I disagree with reviewers rating a game either higher or lower than expected. Dynamite Headdy is one such game.

Title screen (Screenshot taken by the author)

Dynamite Headdy is a single-player platform game developed by Treasure Co., Ltd and published by Sega. It was released for the Mega Drive in 1994 with an 8-bit version being ported to the Game Gear and Master System soon after. It was later released for the Wii Virtual Console (2007), the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 via Sonic’s Ultimate Gensis Collection, and the Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, Microsift Windows Mac OS X and Linux in 2018. For this review, I played the Mega Drive version.

Life was fun at the Treasure Theatre Show until Dark Demon began converting its inhabitants to evil minions. It’s up to Headdy to pursue Dark Demon and defeat him in order to save his friends.

You play as Headdy, a puppet who has the ability to throw his own head at his enemies or to use it to grab Hangmen (round balls) to help him climb to higher parts of the level. Headdy also has the ability to change his head to other heads that give him special abilities, similar to Kid Chameleon (1992). For the most part, there are up to 14 different heads that can be utilised by Headdy. In some later levels, another three are utilised to help Headdy fly.

At the end of each level, Headdy must face a Keymaster. His friend Beau usually shows up to direct Headdy as to where he must hit the Keymaster to defeat them.  

I owned Dynamite Headdy as a teenager and remember playing it over and over again but never completing it. Having revisited the game, I’m sorry to say that I just didn’t enjoy it at all. I actually found the game annoying and it felt like a half-baked idea to me.

That being said, the controls are tight and the gameplay relatively simple. I like the fact that Headdy can throw his head in all directions and can be utilised as a weapon or as an aid to reach higher platforms.

The graphics are bright and colourful. The sprites look great and there is enough variation to keep the game interesting. The animations are quite cool too, like when Headdy has been idle for a while, he’ll take off his head and bounce it like a basketball. However, the music is down right annoying and I found that soon, I’d turned the volume down.

The numerous heads with their unique abilities make the game play quite fun. Although, I wish there they were more integral to the game. Although there are times when swapping heads is necessary, and allows your to pick your route based on the head you pick, I felt as though the game could be beaten with using minimal head swaps when the game really should be full of areas where you cannot progress without acquiring the correct head.

What spoils the game for me, is that it feels very chaotic and discombobulated. The levels seem quite short and just when you’re getting into it, it ends or changes scene. There are also seems to be endless boss battles and although some are quite quirky and ingenious, they grow tiresome as oppose to simply being a good challenge.

The so called “treasures” are not really worth the effort to get.

The game itself is quite long, but offers little in the way of replay value. I can’t see myself returning to play this again anytime soon.

Did I complete the game?

No, I couldn’t get past level 6-2.

What the critics said:

Electronic Gaming Monthly: “Another unique title from the folks at Treasure (the company that gave us Gunstar Heroes). The main character, Headdy, has several excellent attacks (using different “heads”), and the levels are very colorful, with some knockout visual effects (like the rotating platforms, and the giant blimp dog Boss). This is a top action title for the Genesis. Overall 7.6/10.[1]

Gamesmaster: “Is it going too far to suggest that this is Treasure’s contractual obligation game? Probably. Nevertheless, it doesn’t shine like their previous projects. Let’s hope their next one is more of a return to form. Not a disaster but should have been so much better. Overall 76%. [2]

Mean Machines Sega: “If you have your head firmly screwed on, you’ll get Headdy as soon as it comes out. No ifs, no butts! Overall 93%.[3]

Next Generation: “Unlike most games, no two levels or bosses look alike. Most importantly, Dynamite Headdy is loaded with good old-fashioned fun, and that’s what gaming is all about. Isn’t it? Overall 4/5.[4]

My Verdict: “This game is chaotic, frustrating, and feels you’re just being carried through the game as oppose to navigating it yourself. The levels are very linear and rather small when compared to games like Sonic the Hedgehog 3. It’s a Marmite game. You’ll either love it or you’ll hate it.”

My Rating:

What are your memories of Dynamite Headdy? I would love to hear your thoughts, and don’t for get to follow and subscribe so that you don’t miss my latest reviews! You can also find me on Instagram: @nicklovestogame.


[1] ‘Review Crew – Dynamite Headdy’. Electronic Gaming Monthly. (September 1994). Volume 7, Issue 9:36 (https://archive.org/details/Electronic_Gaming_Monthly_62/page/n37/mode/2up Accessed 9th May 2021).

[2] Tucker, T., ‘Review – Dynamite Headdy’. Gamesmaster. (October 1994). Issue 22:52-3. (https://retrocdn.net/images/f/f9/GamesMaster_UK_022.pdf Accessed 9th May 2021).

[3] ‘Review – Dynamite Headdy.’ Mean Machines Sega. (November 1994). Issue 25:74-7. (https://archive.org/details/mean-machines-sega-magazine-25/page/n75/mode/2up Accessed 9th May 2021).

[4] ‘Rating genesis – Dynamite Headdy’. Next Generation. (January 1995). Issue 1:99-101. (https://archive.org/details/nextgen-issue-001/page/n105/mode/2up Accessed 9th May 2021).