The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past

In 1986, The Legend of Zelda was released for the NES and sold over 6 million copies.[1] Its success spawned a whole series of video games that continue today, with every instalment being much anticipated by fans all over the world. A Link to the Past was one of the SNES’s earliest games in Europe, but sadly I wouldn’t get to play it through properly until 2019.

Titlescreen (Screenshot taken by the author)

The Legend of Zelda: Link to the Past is the third game in the Zelda series. It is an action-adventure game developed and published by Nintendo. It released for the SNES in Japan in 1991, and Europe and North America in 1992. It was ported to the Game Boy Advance as A link to the Past and Four Swords, as well as the Wii, Wii U. It was accessible for the Nintendo 3DS through the Virtual console and the Nintendo Switch through Nintendo Switch Online. The version I reviewed was for the SNES which came with the SNES Mini.

You play as young adventurer Link who must defeat the evil Ganon from gaining the power of the Triforce which would allow him to turn the world dark and evil. Link must save the Kingdom of Hyrule and stop Ganon by rescuing several maidens who are the descendants of the Seven Sages. To do this he must scour the dungeons and defeat a plethora of enemies and end of dungeon bosses.

Link can slash or pick up bushes and stones to find health and rupees (Screenshot taken by the author)

Link is armed with a sword, shield, and bow and arrow with which to fight his enemies. By killing the many minions throughout the worlds, you can gain rupees, arrows and health. Your sword has two actions: You can swing it to attack or if you hold the attack button, your sword will charge and will produce 360 degree swing, which is handy if you are surrounded by enemies. Once you gain the Pegasus Boots you can charge your enemies and stab them with your sword. Along the way you can acquire upgrades for your armour, sword and shield as well as many magical items to aid you in your quest.

The open world design enables you to explore every inch of the Light and Dark worlds, which can become frustratingly tedious at times as it involves returning to the same areas with new items to access secret areas. However, a cool aspect of the game is the need to warp from the Light and Dark worlds in different parts of the map in order to access areas that are inaccessible in the other world (it’ll make sense when you play it). The enemies re-spawn which can be annoying at times, but it also gives you the opportunities to gain more health, rupees and magic.

Link must warp from the Light to the Dark worlds and back again to gain access to certain areas

The main music for the Light World, known as the Hyrule Overture, is dramatic and fitting for the game. It is the music of a hero! The overhead perspective offers a more 3D feel to the game and allows more detail and colour to the backgrounds and sprites. The increasing difficulty of the dungeons and end bosses adds a challenging aspect to the game. You will find yourself spending many hours on this game as there is so much to explore. Don’t feel bad if you use a walkthrough, as some items are hard to find.

The dungeons increase in difficulty, so make sure you are well prepared before attempting them (Screenshot taken by the author)

My little brother had a SNES growing up, but he didn’t buy Link to the Past. The first time I saw it was at my friend Graeme’s house. I never really got to play it, but I watched the very early bits of it and was amazed by how great it looked. When I bought the SNES Mini, I was excited that I would finally get to play it. Was it as good as I’d hoped? Hell yes! My only gripe was that by the end of the game I was a bit bored as I felt it had become monotonous, and I should have been wanting more. Other than that, this is a great game and I would recommend it to all.

Did I complete the game?

Yes, but I did have some assistance from a walkthrough to find certain items.

What the critics said:

Nintendo Power: George: “This game is amazing. Its got incredible graphics, great sound effects, and it’s a well thought out adventure. Overall 4.675/5.[2]

Electronic Gaming Monthly: “Wow! This is the closest a game has ever come to being perfect. Everything except the graphics gets the best score possible. Unfortunately, Nintendo let us down when it comes to the graphics as there is nothing spectacular here. Overall 8.75/10.[3]

Computer and Video Games: “The graphics are very simple, but the animation is fluid and the game is packed full of colour. Sound-wise, Zelda III is spot on. It has some great orchestral scores and lovely sound effects throughout. If you liked the first two games, or you fancy a spot of RPG related malarkey, the get this straight away. It’s a corker! Overall 89%”.[4]

Superplay: “The long awaited 16-bit Zelda is a brilliantly designed and implemented adventure that puts similar games to shame, in much the same way as Mario dominates the platform world – Nintendo’s top programmer was involved in both games. Overall 9/10.[5]

Awards:

Best Video Game Sequel (All Systems) – Electronic Gaming Monthly’s Best and Worst of 1992[6]

My verdict:

“It was worth the 27 year wait!!! Beatutiful to look at, excellent gameplay, and an engaging story. Frustratingly lengthy at times, but a classic of the genre, and every gamer must at least attempt to play this game.”

Rating:

What are your memories of Zelda: A Link to the Past? I would love to hear your thoughts, and don’t for get to follow and subscribe so that you don’t miss my latest reviews! You can also find me on Facebook.


[1] Sahdev, I., (November 12th, 2019). ‘The Legend of Zelda – Global Sales’. http://www.gamedesigngazette.com. http://www.gamedesigngazette.com/2018/01/the-legend-of-zelda-global-sales.html Accessed 19th February 2020).

[2] George & Rob. ‘Now Playing: SNES – The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past’. Nintendo Power. (March 1992). Issue 34:105. (https://archive.org/stream/Nintendo_Power_Issue001-Issue127/Nintendo%20Power%20Issue%20034%20March%201992#page/n111/mode/2up Accessed 19th February 2020).

[3] ‘Review Crew: SNES – Zelda III’. Electronic Gaming Monthly. (March 1992). Issue 32:24. (https://retrocdn.net/images/3/35/EGM_US_032.pdf Accessed 19th February 2020).

[4] O’Connor, F., ‘Review: Famicom – The Legend of Zelda III’ Computer and Video Games Magazine. (February 1992). Issue 123: 68. (https://archive.org/details/computer-and-videogames-123/page/n67/mode/2up Accessed 17th February 2020).

[5] ‘What Cart? RPG/Adventure Games: SNES – Zelda III: A Link to the Past’. Superplay. (November 1992). Issue 1:90. (https://archive.org/details/Superplay_Issue_01_1992-11_Future_Publishing_GB/page/n89/mode/2up Accessed 22nd February 2020).

[6] ‘EGM’s Best and Worst of 1992: Best Video Game Sequel (All Game Systems) – Legend of Zelda III‘. Electronic Gaming Monthly’s 1993 Video Game Buyer’s Guide. (1993). :17. (https://retrocdn.net/images/0/04/EGM_US_BuyersGuide_1993.pdf Accessed 21st February 2020).

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